Shared Life Experience

laughterkey:

zoomwitch:

number-one-mollusc-fan:

snerky:

incredible

holy shit

look at this

I don’t even know where to begin.


Track Title: Ain't No Sunshine

Artist: Cœur de Pirate

Album: Trama

Cœur de Pirate | Ain’t No Sunshine

ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone
it’s not warm when she’s away


captain-foulenough:

maybenotboring:

"this fanfiction contains mature themes"

your favorite ship has to file taxes and it’s mad frustrating and creates relationship friction but they get it done and it’s a bonding experience they laugh about later. also eventually they will both die.


natashi-san:

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

[source]

I am both amazed and horrified of nature as we all should be

natashi-san:

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. 
Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. 

You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.

Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

image

[source]


I am both amazed and horrified of nature as we all should be


rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”
"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”

"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.


itschiling:

General, I can’t tell you how sorry we are, but… Carter wanted a steak.

- Upgrades │ Stargate SG-1 │ s04e03


gaywrites:

Transgender youth who take puberty-delaying hormone treatments are more likely to be happier when they fully transition, according to a new study.

The study found that starting on hormone replacements around age 14 resulted in better mental health for trans youth, and that they had an easier time transitioning into their lived and true gender identity later on.

“The first thing this study shows is that transgender young people, with appropriate treatment, can function at the same psychological level as the rest of the population,” Jenifer McGuire, co-author of the study, told BuzzFeed News. “They have the same distribution as everyone else when they’re treated properly.”

The Dutch study, which involved 22 transgender men and 33 transgender women, found that because of the early hormone treatment, the participants ultimately had no more emotional distress, anxiety, or issues with body image than their peers in the general population after they had transitioned. They also required less gender reassignment surgery, as physical characteristics that develop during puberty were suppressed.

Studies like this are so, so important because they add another layer of credibility to the work we already know is important. We know one of the ways to help trans youth become their true selves as happily and healthily as possible, and the research clearly shows that we should keep doing it. 


iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters are angry about these strange negotiations to release protesters. What kind of practice is this?

September 28th



generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.


Gov. Jerry Brown announced Sunday that he has signed a bill that makes California the first in the nation to define when “yes means yes” and adopt requirements for colleges to follow when investigating sexual assault reports.

State lawmakers last month approved SB967 by Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, as states and universities across the U.S. are under pressure to change how they handle rape allegations. Campus sexual assault victims and women’s advocacy groups delivered petitions to Brown’s office on Sept. 16 urging him to sign the bill.

De Leon has said the legislation will begin a paradigm shift in how college campuses in California prevent and investigate sexual assaults. Rather than using the refrain “no means no,” the definition of consent under the bill requires “an affirmative, conscious and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity.”

"Every student deserves a learning environment that is safe and healthy," De Leon said in a statement Sunday night. "The State of California will not allow schools to sweep rape cases under the rug. We’ve shifted the conversation regarding sexual assault to one of prevention, justice, and healing."

The legislation says silence or lack of resistance does not constitute consent. Under the bill, someone who is drunk, drugged, unconscious or asleep cannot grant consent.


queerhawkeye:

alec hardison + tumblr text posts (screencaps by psssfff)



amethystarcher:

“You thought I would not weesh to marry him? Or per’aps, you hoped?” said Fleur, her nostrils flaring. “What do I care how he looks? I am good-looking enough for both of us, I theenk! All these scars show is zat my husband is brave! And I shall do zat!” she added fiercely, pushing Mrs. Weasley aside and snatching the ointment from her.

This was a wonderful moment because until this moment all the readers had gotten was perspective from the Weasleys, who kind of treated her like an outcast. The Weasleys are hardly ever criticized for the way the treat people, but Ginny and Molly especially were unwelcoming to Fleur and couldn’t fathom why she and Bill were getting married besides that they were both attractive. Fleur was probably treated a certain way all her life because she was so attractive. When Fleur called them out on their bullshit and showed how much she cared for Bill, that was the moment I fell in love with her character.

She was a small role in the books and even smaller in the movies, but she was an amazing person. I would read a book dedicated just to her story and point of view, and it’s all because of this moment. With one paragraph, Fleur was given dimension and emotion, making her interesting and sympathetic. She’d known the Weasleys didn’t exactly approve of her and Bill together but had remained silent perhaps in hope that it would get better over time, and the moment Mrs. Weasley had said he “was” going to get married, Fleur’s good behavior snapped, revealing how amazing she really is.